The James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute
 
 
 
                   A PUBLICATION OF THE PATRICK C . WALSH PROSTATE CANCER RESEARCH FUND

   A Combined Operation to Restore Urinary and Sexual Function                

       Volume 10, Winter 2014

prostate cancer
Burnett, who has written two books for men
with prostate cancer, has good news for men
who need extra help: A successful operation
that restores urinary continence and potency
at the same time.

Having both urinary incontinence and impotence after radical prostatectomy should be a rare complication, but some men find themselves in this situation and need help. Surgeon Arthur Burnett, M.D., M.B.A., has good news for these men: A successful operation that restores both urinary continence and potency at the same time.


"The conventional management for men having both erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy has been separate operations, in which a man undergoes correction of one problem at a time," with implantation of an inflatable penile prosthesis and an artificial urinary sphincter, respectively, says Burnett, the Patrick C. Walsh Distinguished Professor in Urology. "These options represent surgical interventions for some of the most severe occurrences of these complications, while achieving high satisfaction rates."


But Burnett has been offering an alternative option, implanting both devices at one surgical setting, for 13 years. "It has the advantage for efficient and rapid resumption of both functions," he notes. Burnett recently reviewed a consecutive series of 55 men who underwent this combined procedure at Johns Hopkins from January 2000 to December 2011. In the study, published in the Journal of Urology, he described the specialized surgical technique and showed that the rate of complications with the combined operation was just as low as in men who had two separate operations. "This investigation has confirmed that combination prosthetic device surgery is an option, in additional to single implantation surgery, to enable men sustaining sexual and urinary functional complications after prostate cancer surgery to become functional again."





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