The James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute
 
 
 
   KIDNEY STONES            Print this page

  
WHAT IS A URETERAL STENT?


A ureteral stent is a small plastic tube used to temporarily drain the kidney. Most ureteral stents are ~2 mm in diameter.

WHAT DOES A URETERAL STENT LOOK LIKE?


WHAT SHOULD I EXPECT WHEN I HAVE A URETERAL STENT?

  • Irritating Voiding Symptoms
    Many patients are greatly bothered by their ureteral stent, whereas other patients feel as though they have not even had a stent placed. Most patients commonly complain of symptoms associated with voiding, such as voiding more frequently, having a tremendous urgency to void, burning with voiding, and feeling discomfort in their kidney when they void. Sometimes these symptoms can be controlled with medications, but other times they cannot.

  • Hematuria
    You might see blood in your urine when you have a ureteral stent. In most cases, the blood will give the urine a fruit punch-like appearance. Although this may seem alarming, please know that it is unlikely that you are losing a significant amount of blood. The degree of hematuria can be minimized by consuming liquids (strive for 2 liters per day).

WHAT SHOULD I CALL MY DOCTOR FOR WHEN I HAVE A URETERAL STENT?

  • Fever
    It is not normal to have a fever with a ureteral stent. If you develop a temperature greater than 101o F please call your doctor, as this may indicate a serious infection.

  • Bleeding
    Although mild hematuria is normal, if the urine becomes thick with blood, so that it resembles the consistency of tomato soup, call your doctor, as this may indicate that there is bleeding in the kidney.

  • Increasing Pain
    If the character of the discomfort associated with the stent changes, particularly if you begin to develop severe kidney pain, call your doctor, as this may indicate that the stent is not draining properly.




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